Summer Pleasures – Watching Hummingbirds

One of summer’s greatest pleasures for me is sitting on my porch that has transformed into a jungle of house plants now outside for the season, potted plants waiting for a forever-spot somewhere in my landscape, and vines and grasses stretching towards the sun. There are wind chimes catching the slightest breeze, and a hummingbird feeder.
This summer, more hummingbirds have come to our feeder than ever before. Sometimes there are so many of them that they sound like an old-fashioned army of propeller airplanes roaring over our heads.
Every once in a while one of them sits still and watches the action, like this male ruby-throated hummingbird:

Hummingbird on hosta flower

Hummingbird on hosta flower

Once the hummers take flight, they move so fast that my camera can only capture them in blurry mode. I still like the images, especially when they show off their acrobatic moves (they can fly backwards!), and the way they use their wing and tail feathers to control speed and motion.
These are ruby-throated hummingbirds. Only the males have a red throat. As you can see in some of the pictures, they are territorial and try to chase their competitors away using their wings and beaks. (Click on any picture to enlarge)

For my earlier posts on hummingbirds, check Avian Jewels, Hummingbird Ballet and Hummingbird Rescue. They are fascinating little creatures!

About Beauty Along the Road

My name is Annette. I am passionate about nature, health, simplicity, self-reliance, truth, and life-long learning. Originally from Germany, I now live in Virginia, USA. I am a therapist, health coach, writer, photographer, and organic gardener.
This entry was posted in Animals and Critters and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

48 Responses to Summer Pleasures – Watching Hummingbirds

  1. de Wets Wild says:

    Brilliant photographs! Frozen in time, and still you’ve captured their frenzied activity wonderfully!

    Like

  2. Thanks Annette. I have a few that visit my flowers, but can’t photograph them with my cellphone!
    They are a delight to watch.πŸ™‚

    Like

  3. Carol says:

    We have Anna’s and Rufous this year – equally territorial.

    Like

  4. Wow! You got some gorgeous shots,here. Thank you for sharing them!

    Like

  5. ybawany says:

    Beautiful. Where were these taken? I’d love to photograph hummingbirds someday.πŸ™‚

    Like

  6. I absolutely love these little creatures and am fascinated with them! I have yet to capture one in a photo this year as they are always so fast or I don’t have my camera ready. Your pictures are fantastic!

    Like

  7. Wind chimes, hummingbirds and tropical plants, what could be better on a summer’s day? Lovely post.πŸ™‚

    Like

  8. mithriluna says:

    These are fantastic! Earlier in the year, I visited Arizona and was able to capture a few shots of hummingbirds but here in NJ, there is only one (or maybe 2) that visit my garden. But I have to be out there at the right time.

    Like

  9. Very nice. I thought Bluebirds were hard, but Humming Birds are nigh impossible. You seem to have the knack. Thanks!

    Like

  10. Very amazing photos! I have never seen hummingbirds like this! I have tried to get them to come to my feeder with little results! Yes this is a summer pleasure to watch!

    Like

  11. Maria F. says:

    What beautiful reunion! I love them!

    Like

  12. lolaWi says:

    wow! beautiful captures!πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I’m glad I read all the comments because I wanted to know what you feed them too.πŸ™‚ Here in Nicaragua we can’t buy hummingbird feeders or food. I bring a hummingbird feeder back from the states every time I return to my island and I have to make the food for them the same way you do.
    I’m curious to know if our hummingbirds migrate. I really don’t think they do because we live in a tropical climate. But, I’ll be on the lookout for yours. Who knows? Maybe some ruby-throated hummers will come visit us in the fall.πŸ™‚ Beautiful shots, by the way! Oh, one more thing! They fight like crazy and chase each other away from the feeders. It’s kind of fun to watch.

    Like

    • Hi Debbie – I doubt that your hummers in Nicaragua have any need to migrate. They’ve got it madeπŸ™‚ If you see our ruby-throats fighting with your native ones, say hello for me. Between Latin America and Northern South America, you have the largest diversity of hummingbirds anywhere. Enjoy them, they are so much fun to watch. The symbolism for hummingbirds (according to Ted Andrews) is “Joy.”

      Liked by 1 person

  14. What a beautiful and rare capture of the hummingbird sitting still. The colours are gorgeous.πŸ™‚

    Like

  15. Beautiful shots! I have been watching them feed in the flower beds outside the kitchen window!

    Like

  16. What beauties! Love the images, great shots!

    Like

  17. Tina Schell says:

    Wow Annette, that first shot is amazing. Can’t believe you could capture such a fast-mover so perfectly! Well doneπŸ˜„πŸ˜„

    Like

    • Thank you, Tina. Usually, they are in perpetual motion, but this guy seemed to need more rest than usual and was sitting on a flower for a long time, just taking in the scenery and watching the others go crazy around the feeder.

      Like

  18. W.H. SIM says:

    gorgeous shot of the gorgetted male!πŸ™‚

    Like

  19. asqfish says:

    I love humming birds but my humming bird feeder was invaded by ants:(

    Like

Let me know what you think!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s