Seasonal Abstractions

Winter is coming to an end, slowly but surely. Tree branches are swelling, sap is rising, the first robins have arrived. On a warm day recently, I saw a honey bee sitting on a patch of ice. No flowers in bloom yet! “Go back to your hive and sip honey,” I suggested. Like the bee, I am impatient for spring to arrive.

Langsam aber sicher kann ich das Ende des Winters sehen. Baumzweige schwellen an, die erste Rotkehlchen sind angekommen. Vor kurzem sah ich an einem warmen Tag eine Honigbiene auf dem eisigen Boden sitzen. Die Blumen blühen noch nicht! “Geh zu deinem Bienenstock zurück und trink noch mehr Honig”, schlug ich vor. Wie die Biene, bin ich ungeduldig und kann kaum noch auf den Frühling warten.

In the meantime, the outgoing season holds a few surprises, like this icy apparition:

In der Zwischenzeit bringt uns die ausgehende Saison noch ein paar Überraschungen, wie diese eisige Erscheinung:

apparition

Or a rocky protrusion masquerading as a face:

Oder ein Felsvorsprung getarnt als ein Gesicht:

protrusion

An intriguing abstraction that leaves me grasping for an image – what might it be?

Eine interessante Abstraktion, die sich nicht erraten lässt – was könnte es sein?

mask

Columns of an ancient structure, or bars on a jail window?

Säulen einer alten Struktur, oder Gitter vor einem Gefängnis Fenster?

ice columns

Would it be too simplistic to just call this a curtain?

Wäre es zu einfach sein, einen Vorhang vorzuschlagen?

ice curtain

You could imagine key holes, but in the end, it’s just see-through holes:

Du könntest dir Schlüssellöcher vorstellen, aber am Schluss sind es doch nur Löcher:

holes

What movie did this strange creature escape from?

Aus welchem Film ist diese seltsame Kreatur herausgesprungen?

creature

Veiled figures move quietly like shadows, pressed against the cold wall. I am in there somewhere, waiting for spring:

Verschleierte Figuren bewegen sich leise wie Schatten und drücken sich gegen die kalte Wand. Ich bin dort dabei und warte auf den Frühling:

veiled figures

The Daily Post Photo challenge: Seasons
Ailsa’s Travel Theme: Abstract

About Beauty Along the Road

My name is Annette. I am passionate about nature, health, simplicity, self-reliance, truth, and life-long learning. Originally from Germany, I now live in Virginia, USA. I am a therapist, health coach, writer, photographer, and organic gardener.
This entry was posted in Artistic Inspiration, Travel Theme Challenge, Weekly Photo Challenge and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

24 Responses to Seasonal Abstractions

  1. wildsherkin says:

    Amazing images! I’m seeing an enchanted forest (the curtain image). They are incredibly beautiful. You have a great eye!

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  2. Chas Spain says:

    Wonderful observations – I hope the thaw comes soon for you – and the bees.

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  3. Lovely sentiments Annette! I totally adore these.Each of the photo was a myriad of beauty,each one has its own story to tell. My personal favorite was the last photo.. Its Stunning!

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  4. jansenphoto says:

    Lovely images. I particularly like the fact that you put a twist on them through excellent composition! Thank you for sharing!

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  5. Interesting and beautiful photos, I do see the first signs of spring as well.

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  6. Fun photos and musings on ice and winter Annette. We have had a very mild winter so I’m not feeling the usual rush for spring. I hope it arrives soon for you. 🙂

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  7. Michael says:

    I saw a honey bee the other day, too, on an unseasonably warm day where I live. And I thought the same as you… Maybe head back to the hive and give it a few more weeks! I loved that a bee or two came out to check on things. Probably taking messages back to the hive. It’s warm, but the flowers are still sleeping…

    Amazing how the ice melted. The patterns of nature always reflect meaning and mystery back to us, both at once somehow!

    Peace
    Michael

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    • Last year, I saw bees on our compost pile (think bright orange peels, veggie scraps) because there was nothing in bloom yet. They are definitely drawn to color! We leave honey in the hive (instead of sugar water) so they can stay strong and well-fed until spring blooms arrive.
      And, yes, to your observation about the meaning and mystery in nature’s patterns. I almost didn’t stop for this frozen ice along the side of the road. It looked old and grey. But I did and was pleasantly surprised finding interesting details and patterns.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Nice connection with two photo challenges, Annette. Brilliant.🙂

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  9. Nicely done.
    “Auch aus Steinen [und Eis], die einem in den [Winter-]Weg gelegt werden, kann man Schönes bauen.” Goethe

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  10. Lovely ice captures😊

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  11. shoreacres says:

    I miss snow, but I miss ice, too. The spring melt always was so exciting — even if it eventually meant a mess on the country roads, and great globs of mud everywhere. It still was the necessary first step toward spring, and it smelled wonderful.

    Like

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