Dialogue on Peaceful Co-Existence

While driving over the mountains today, I deliberately shut off the radio. Both local and world news lately have been utterly disappointing, disgusting, and/or disillusioning. Is there any hope that all this jockeying for power, control and money will ever stop? That humans will dialog with each other instead of committing unspeakable cruel acts?

Locally, Virginia’s governor is officially supporting a proposed pipeline that would carry fracked gas from West Virginia to North Carolina. This monster pipeline would traverse steep mountains in our county, fragment pristine forests and pollute the cleanest streams anywhere in the Eastern US. Environmental groups across three states are fighting the pipeline, but the big energy companies have carefully prepared their path. They put laws in place that give them the right to seize land against the property owners’ will. This land-stealing method is called “eminent domain.”

Everyday, it seems, there’s more heart-breaking information and Nature is diminished a bit more by our incessant need for space and energy.

After I arrived in the city, this flower-covered fence caught my attention.

along the sidewalk

I found a place to park and walked back down the street to investigate.

Morning glories and pumpkin blossoms along the fence

Morning glories and pumpkin blossoms along the fence

The purple flowers rambling all over the fence, the pillars of the porch, and through nearby shrubs, were morning glories, specifically, Grandpa Ott morning glories.

looking inside MG

This variety originated in Bavaria (Germany) and was gifted to the founders of the Seed Savers Exchange (a seed company) in the early 1970s by Grandpa Ott. It self-seeds and can become highly invasive. I read on one gardening site that just a few vines of Grandpa Ott’s morning glories produced thousands of tiny seedlings over the following years. They seem to be so invasive in Arizona, that the Arizona Department of Agriculture has prohibited the sale of morning glories in that state.

While I admired the proliferation of these beautiful flowers along the fence and up a pillar to the front porch of this house,

flag and Grandpa Ott

I could also see the beginnings of invasive spreading in the large holly shrubs and other tall bushes bordering the property:

morning glories spreading through the bushes

morning glories spreading through the bushes

morning glories in the holly

morning glories in the holly

Maybe the neighbors will appreciate sharing the purple bounty, maybe they won’t.

What was even more intriguing was the space-sharing arrangement Grandpa Ott had with a sprawling pumpkin vine that produced lovely yellow blossoms:

single pumpkin blossom

single pumpkin blossom

and exactly one large pumpkin just inside the iron fence:

pumpkin

pumpkin

If an invasive morning glory and a rambling pumpkin vine can dialog with each other and share precious real estate along one fence

co-existence along the fence

co-existence along the fence

why is it so difficult for people to get along and share the one planet we were all gifted with?

For more posts containing “dialogue,” check out the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.

About Beauty Along the Road

My name is Annette. I am passionate about nature, health, simplicity, self-reliance, truth, and life-long learning. Originally from Germany, I now live in Virginia, USA. I am a therapist, health coach, writer, photographer, and organic gardener.
This entry was posted in Flora, Healing Ourselves and the Planet, Weekly Photo Challenge and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to Dialogue on Peaceful Co-Existence

  1. Carol says:

    In the past, I have never avoided the news. Now it makes want to weep, and I have begun to play ostrich. It’s called preserving sanity, or a semblance thereof.

    Like

  2. This was beautiful and I love your analogy. You are right on the money!

    Your photos are gorgeous. Let’s all turn off the news and pay attention to nature. It IS everything!

    Like

    • Until they come and bulldoze the nature in your backyard (as they are trying to do in our county)๐Ÿ˜ฆ
      I do find a lot of comfort in nature, it is still a great escape and source of inspiration. Thanks for your comment, Cathy.

      Like

  3. Such a lovely thoughtful post, Annette. It will come as no surprise to you that I agree wholeheartedly with your feelings. Nature has so much to teach us if we would just pay attention.

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    • Thank you, Barbara. I believe that Nature has the answers to pretty much everything – think of the plants that have gathered intelligence for 200 million years and know how to share the same space (underground and above ground) by drawing on different nutrients and light levels. There’s always change going on and plants are able to adapt in amazing ways. But we’ve been so intent on “conquering” Nature and imposing our “superior” knowledge and technology that we’ve lost touch with authentic knowing. Nature can be ruthless and cruel as well (earthquakes, mud slides, volcanic eruptions will eradicate a lot of life forms), but never based on hare-brained religious or political beliefs or racial hatred or the needs of narcissistic egos.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. dogear6 says:

    I took pictures of those type of morning glories at Ginter last year and had no idea that’s what they were called. I also had no idea they were so invasive! That’s as bad as my trumpet vine along the fence. Ginter doesn’t have a problem with them, mostly because they are on a fence between a paved sidewalk and a children’s playground that is packed dirt and gravel.

    I agree with you on the news. I’m disgusted with it too.

    Nancy

    Like

    • Hi Nancy – I love those trumpet vines, too – and have seen them take over entire walls on buildings. It’s amazing how some of these plants have developed their survival strategy, there is a unique intelligence there.

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  5. Tish Farrell says:

    Your dialogue is very beautiful, Annette. What a crying shame that when corporations and politicians become fixated on resources, all humane judgement flies out the window. We do not have to use oil in the quantities that we use it. We do not have to frack. The geo-politics of oil are becoming more and more horrendous.

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  6. estoyenmanosdelalfarero says:

    Wow- thank you for sharing. These are amazing pictures, but more so, beautiful analogies to how we as humans should be treating each other. Thanks again and God bless.
    Helene

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  7. Aggie says:

    I am so discouraged by what parts of humanity are and do. Thanks for voicing it so well.

    Like

  8. Paula says:

    A sound reasoning! Beautiful blooms that I would not mind having on my balcony. Thanks for sharing Annette!

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  9. The photos are gorgeous, and the sentiment you shared is quite appropriate for our time.

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  10. Good question! Your posts always give me much to ponder! Thanks, Annette for an uplifting and beautiful post.

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  11. jpeggytaylor says:

    I wholeheartedly support your sentiments in this post. It seems greed has sucked out the humanity from those who seem hell-bent on destroying our planet. I was just commenting earlier to someone who had shared a post on “Brother Eagle, Sister Sky: A Message from Chief Seattle” – this is the story of Chief Seattle’s message to the then Washington government (150 years ago) when the government wanted to buy his people’s land. Chief Seattle believed that all life on earth and the earth itself is sacred – buying and selling land was not part of their culture. The story is a plea for man to stop destroying nature. Here we are 150 years on, and the only thing that has changed is that the greed of a small few has destroyed even more of our precious natural world.

    On a brighter note! … the flowers are beautiful – thank you for sharing them๐Ÿ™‚ I never knew Morning Glories could become an invasive species! I was pondering on growing some in pots in my yard earlier this year but thought our northern climate may be too harsh for them and opted for Sweet Peas instead.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Peggy, you expand on the theme very well. I was overlooking a vast expanse of mountains a few days ago, and this same thought came to mind: how can humans possibly think that they can “own” this wild land. The land belongs to itself and should be respected and honored by us humans. Yet, we chip away at it until its fragmented, spoiled, and used up – all in defense of our standard of living and “needs.”
      Glad you enjoyed the flowers. If you can grow sweet peas, you probably can grow morning glories as well. But read the instructions for planting. The seed has a very hard shell that needs nicking before soaking for 24 hrs; then it’s ready to sprout. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  12. What a great post, and yes I do’t watch the news unless I feel it’s something I want to read or hear. It’s just so negative too… You know how to bring my spirits up.

    Like

  13. We have friends in northern Colorado who experience frequent tremors because of the extensive fracking. I could go on and on, but I’d rather enjoy your wonderful. vivid and brilliant flower pictures. Our neighbor always plants pumpkin and zucchini seeds with his flowers, and the combination is a delight.
    Excellent post.

    Like

  14. It’s heartbreaking to hear about land stealing to build a fracking pipeline. Here in the UK government and development companies have been watching the USA, and now they want to frack here too….but it’s met with much opposition so far….everything about it just seems wrong to me, and once we have polluted the ancient water far beneath the surface, it can never be made over…..it makes me so cross and very sad.

    Like

  15. Wonderful images of nature’s bounty, Annette. I love the photo with the Stars and Stripes. I so agree with you that the news everywhere is so depressing these days.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Sue Slaght says:

    Such gorgeous photos and a calm and beautiful reprieve from the world news to be sure.

    Liked by 1 person

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