Misty, Misty Day

Some days start out bright and clear, others emerge only slowly from the morning mists:

Hill in morning mist

Hill in morning mist

Mist rising from the mountain

Mist rising from the mountain

And just when we think the air is clear and that we can see where we are going…

almost clear

almost clear

The mist gets thicker and thicker, becomes all enveloping

misty woods

misty woods

It is spooky here, in no man’s land. Vines dangle soundlessly in the misty void:

vines dangling from tall trees

vines dangling from tall trees

The vines have grown high up the trees, twisting and twirling and knotting themselves into convoluted shapes. Do the trees ever complain of the burden of weight, having to share food and water with them?

Almost unnoticed, subversively, new life begins to bud through the misty layers of the day

budding tree

budding tree

And when you have almost accepted the new reality of a misty, foggy world, you emerge on the other side. Oh, how clear the air, how bright the colors!

Below the fog line

Below the fog line

This post has been created in response to Ailsa’s Travel Theme: Misty.

About Beauty Along the Road

My name is Annette. I am passionate about nature, health, simplicity, self-reliance, truth, and life-long learning. Originally from Germany, I now live in Virginia, USA. I am a therapist, health coach, writer, photographer, and organic gardener.
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46 Responses to Misty, Misty Day

  1. Barneysday says:

    Wonderful shots that create an eerie, almost damp mood. Very well done

    Like

  2. I love this….I’ve gotta get out of the mist

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  3. cindy knoke says:

    So mysterious and fabulous! Bravo!

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  4. Wonderful misty pics, Annette. Those dangling vines look very spooky.๐Ÿ˜ฏ

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  5. y. prior says:

    really beautiful way to present your photos –๐Ÿ™‚ such a nice post.

    Like

  6. restlessjo says:

    Beautiful! Wonderfully atmospheric ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  7. Beautiful and moody post…I loved walking those mist filled woods with you….and then that final shock of colour at the end๐Ÿ™‚

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  8. Aggie says:

    Your vines look like ours. We have dead trees whose trunks are indented where vines constricted them. We have read that the profusion of vines are a result of climate change, but the locals tell us that they don’t harm the trees. ??? Too bad for me that many of ours are red haired poison ivy!

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    • I am also quite weary of vines since I am highly allergic to poison ivy…sometimes I break out from an invisible (to me) remnant on firewood.

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      • Aggie says:

        Have you tried Tecnu and Calagel? I am not as sensitive to you, but I carried firewood with ivy on it in my bare arms last fall and got a pretty bad case. After a week I finally bought this stuff and it had an immediate and significant impact.

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        • I never heard of these, Aggie. Calagel must be a topical cream? But Tecnu, what is it?
          I make a jewelweed infusion (in vodka) each year and wipe my skin with it if I think I have been exposed. But if I don’t catch it on a preventative basis….it gets ugly.

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      • Aggie says:

        Tecnu is the wash. (I get the one with beads so only scrub – gently – for 15 sec.). Calagel is the soothing gel. Both made by the same company. It’s not natural, but it was developed by an engineer for his family’s “poison.” Amazon and Walmart have it. I had a thick, blistery rash covering 90% of my forearms and ankles for a week, and it had been spreading hourly all over my body. The rash began to dissipate within an hour of the first bath. I tried leaving out the Calagel, but it is important too, and it is wonderfully soothing, like aloe vera in texture. If I hadn’t found this, Lou was going to be prodding me to go to the doc, and I didn’t want steroids. I hope I can help someone by spreading the word. Poison ivy and oak must have literally killed some people in the past.

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        • Ok, I will look for it – doesn’t hurt to have a backup. When I got stung by two yellow jackets last summer and had a systemic reaction (similar to poison ivy), I took osha tincture, plantain tincture, and quercetin tablets and it took care of the whole rash overnight.

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      • Aggie says:

        I will remember your herbal solution to the yellow-jacket stings, thank you. I cured a full-blown MRSA infection, that was literally killing me, with an herbal tincture. I read about jewel weed for poison ivy, but don’t know if we have it locally. Lou’s wife, who has passed away, was a botanist, and said that the remedy for any plant was always within 20′ of the plant.

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        • Which state are you in, Aggie? Jewelweed tends to grow in moist areas, usually in stream banks or moist wooded hills.
          Are you familiar with Stephen Buhner’s books, Herbal Antibiotics, Sacred Plant Medicine, etc. There is so much to learn about plants!

          Like

      • Aggie says:

        Thanks, Annette. I finally Googled jewel weed images. I have seen its flowers on our place, but not many. Thank you for the author tip. I was looking for a place to start with herbal learning.

        Like

  9. I’ve wondered the same things about the vines, Annette, which have a stranglehold on some of my trees. Beautiful images.

    Like

  10. doreenb8 says:

    Absolutely beautiful but also very scary.

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  11. Amy says:

    Wonderful selections of misty photos! Especially the vines dangling from tall trees.๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  12. Suzanne Fluhr (Boomeresque) says:

    Such lovely photos of what could not be seen or not be seen well and then of what was behind the veil.

    Like

  13. Suzanne Fluhr (Boomeresque) says:

    Lovely photos of what you couldn’t see or couldn’t see well (usually a photographer’s bane) and then of what was behind the veil.

    Like

  14. y. prior says:

    enjoyed the variety! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  15. Beautiful, beautiful!

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  16. mithriluna says:

    Beautiful Annette!

    Like

  17. dadirri7 says:

    great contrasts … gorgeous mysterious mists!

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  18. The journey of all of our lives…… mist and clearity……it’s all an adventure….. beautifully captured Annette.

    Like

  19. souldipper says:

    I’ve had a wee peek at some of your postings…I like the atmosphere you’ve created here. I may have to try some of those interesting suggestions re allergy/reactions. I still like to chop and stack my winter wood, but am in the land of cedar. My skin doesn’t like it!

    Loved the spiritual sculptures!

    Many thanks for visiting me. Hope you find Gin’s book to your liking.

    Like

  20. marypoppinz says:

    Those were deliciously spooky๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  21. Dina says:

    Moody, misty and deliciously spooky, that’s what it is. Well done!๐Ÿ™‚

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  22. tree girl says:

    We get days like this here in the Blue Mountains. They are the most magical mystical days.

    Your photos capture it so beautifully.

    Like

  23. I love misty pictures, they’re so atmospheric and mysterious looking. I love those curlicue vines too. And that last picture is really gorgeous with that line of golden grasses and the mist as backdrop.๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

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